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Topic Title: Hour by Hour Boards in a Low Vol. High Mix Envir.
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Created On: 08/04/2010 11:04 AM
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08/04/2010 02:34 PM
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78935
Alan Burnett



How do you use an Hour by Hour Board for manufacturing where the takt for 1 unit is more than 60 minutes?
08/04/2010 04:26 PM
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MarkRosenthal
Mark Rosenthal



What is supposed to get done within that hour?
Did it get done?
08/05/2010 10:03 AM
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AGN
Aleks Neubauer



Simple answer may be that there is no output reported in some of the hour increments. Output may only be reported every 1.5 hr's. Another option would be to track progress @ a lower level of the assembly which has a takt of <1 hr.
08/05/2010 04:55 PM
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22767
Sam Tomas



I don't know how your board is layed out but one popular approach is to worry about daily totals and not so much hourly totals.

Have a board display three rows of 8 blocks, for an hour shift. The rows show the following data example, assuming 8 units per hour or 64 per day is the desired production. Assume the first four hours have been completed.

Cummulative planned: 8 16 24 32 40 48 56 64
Actual per hour: 7 7 9 10
Cummulative actual: 7 14 23 33

It's been said that workers start slow in the morning, work faster in mid-morning, slow down by lunch time, start slow in the early afternoon right after lunch, and then speed up to assure daily schedules are met. This board will help them determine where they are and when they have to speed up and by how much. It assumes that they can speed up their particualr activity or operation.
08/06/2010 09:24 AM
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Laeeqe
Laeeqe Khan



Dear Alan
Can you tell me your product and steps of process?
I think your SMV [/I]is more than 1 hour but your [I]BMV must be in 15 or 30 minutes .
08/06/2010 09:27 AM
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KyleMeyers
Kyle Meyers



When I was supervising a machining department, I tried to using a day by hour board for some CNC machines. Their cycle times ranged from 20 minutes to 2 hours depending on the product (setup included) and the run quantities were typically 1 to 2 pieces (custom conference tables). Standard time was not set but most operators could closely estimate how long a job could take base on their experience. What I asked them to do was estimate their work in 4-6 hour blocks. What they would get done, how long each job would take, and how long the job actually took. This way, they could start getting better at estimating their cycle time and record their productivity. I did audit them from time to time to make sure the times were reasonable. I have attached the board template if anyone wants to use it.

Edited: 08/06/2010 at 12:37 PM by Lean Moderator


08/06/2010 12:37 PM
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DMcGan
David McGan



It may be moving a little off-topic, but if you experience inconsistent work output throughout the day, that could be an indication of the need to improve the defined standard work, to improve consistency and make problems more apparent.
08/09/2010 11:36 AM
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KyleMeyers
Kyle Meyers



Standard work definitely helps. However, there are some jobs shops such as mine where the product variation is uncontrollable sue to customer specifications. The trick with standard work in this situation is to definie it at the lowest possible level and look for procedural improvements.
08/12/2010 09:43 AM
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Rachel_Cooper
Rachel Pearson



We have an operation where we expect one unit every 2 hours. In this case, we drew a time scale down the left side of the chart in 15 minute increments, then drew a line across the chart every 2 hours. An operator will place an 'X' next to the time that a unit was complete. If the operation is running well, there should be one X drawn for each 2 hour block. If the unit was a defect, the X is circled and a comment written. If the machine is not running, there will be an arrow drawn for the down period and a comment written.
08/12/2010 09:43 AM
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160432
Dhamotharan Rengalwar



I do agree that hour by hour board will help where the product variety is less or certain volumes of particular product is made as batches.

If you go through the Process control chart-picking explained in "Toyota way Production system" ,you can understand better.
Happy learning.
08/12/2010 01:13 PM
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khanson
Kyle Hanson



Alan,

Can you clarify for us whether you consistently make products with a takt >60min, or do you make a variety of items with a large takt time?
08/16/2010 09:19 AM
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Lean_Hort
Jason Rekker



Similar problems here in that inherent product variation and product mix makes it impossible to map or aim for a level workflow hour by hour. Half-day or daily totals make a lot more sense to me, and I'm going to try that.
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