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Topic Title: Lean Book Club
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Created On: 09/11/2012 02:35 PM
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09/11/2012 02:48 PM
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TiffanyPowers
Tiffany Powers



My manufacturing facility has just finished two years of Lean training that we were able to conduct with a grant from the state of Massachusetts. We are looking at ways to continue learning as well as involve new employees. One of the suggestions was to hold a Lean book club. We aer starting off with the book The Toyota Way fieldbook. We got some great ideas from the author on how to structure the discussion. I'm looking for information from those who may have already started a book club. Resources on discussion questions, books to read, how to keep interest etc. Any information is appreciated and if I am successful, I will share any information (or share the what not to do!)
Regards
Tiffany Powers
09/11/2012 03:10 PM
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Boeing_Lean
Ken Hunt



Tiffany,

A few suggestions:

Lean Thinking by Womack and Jones
Learning to See by Mike Rother and John Shook (Value Stream Mapping)
Managing to Learn by John Shook (The A3 Process)
Flight of the Buffalo by Belasco and Stayer

Hope this helps
Ken
09/11/2012 05:00 PM
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181752
Jeff Hajek



Hi Tiffany,

I'm partial to the book, Whaddaya Mean I Gotta Be Lean? Building the bridge from job satisfaction to corporate profit, by Jeff Hajek. (It's available on Amazon.com). I hear the author really knows his stuff.

Hope that helps.
Jeff Hajek
Velaction Continuous Improvement
09/12/2012 10:35 AM
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JimBecker
James Becker



Blatant self promotion
09/13/2012 09:32 PM
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181752
Jeff Hajek



I think I actually went beyond blatant...Kinda hurt my shoulder patting myself on the back.
09/14/2012 08:13 PM
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LeanSpec
Dave Kippen



I love "2 second Lean" by Paul Akers. Its a fun, visual, simple read which is good after you try and snooze your way through Lean Thinking LOL (For the record, I did like Lean Thinking!)

That book seemed to generate a LOT of discussion when I used it as a kick off for some management level training. I made them all read it :)
09/14/2012 08:13 PM
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Steve1967
Stephen Doyle



Tiffany

Great idea, quite brilliant.
I agree with Ken Hunt. I would also add The Gold Mine by Ball & /Balle as this discusses not only the tools of Lean and the People side of things but intertwines this in a novel so you can also look at the lighter side of things if the club session gets to serious.

Steve
09/19/2012 06:44 PM
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BryanBudahn
Bryan Budahn



My vote would be for "Creating a Lean Culture" (Mann)
09/21/2012 12:21 PM
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134827
Rick Foreman



We've realized great success, with engaging the front office team through the Hitchhiker Guide to Lean by Jamie Flinchbaugh. It does a great job of covering the basic understanding that lean is not just for manufacturing. We had over 200 go through the book club study by answering questions per chapter, leading and participating in discussions, with follow up as to application in all functions. Lots of great feedback.

I also like the book 2 Second Lean. Our next book club will be A Factory of One by Dan Markovitz and we're beginning with our Sales and Marketing team. With this group it is a little tougher for them to see, what lean can mean to them and their functions. Our entire organization completes at least one book club study a year, which includes more than simply reading and discussion. The process has really helped change our organizational culture to a deeper continuous improvement focus.

Our manufacturing teams utilize WCM by Rubrich and the Gemba Academy.

Hope this helps.
09/21/2012 12:21 PM
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Steve24
Steve Howell



My suggestion would be these:

The Toyota Way to Continuous Improvement (Liker/Franz)
The Toyota Way (Liker)
Toyota Culture (Liker/Hoseus)
Understanding A3 Thinking (Sobek/Smally)
How to Prevent Lean Implementation Failures (Rubich)
The Complete Lean Enterprise (Locher/Keyte)
The 5 Pillars of the Visual Workplace (Hirano) - my fav for 5S
Implementing TWI - (Graupp/Wrona)
Leading Chage - (Kotter)
Creating a Lean Culture (Mann)
09/24/2012 02:50 PM
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Mike_Thelen
Michael Thelen



I'd say that's a great list. I like them all.
09/25/2012 05:59 PM
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JohnPod
John Podlasek



"Today and Tomorrow" - Henry Ford
"Human Action" - Ludwig von Mises
"The Wild Wheel" - Garet Garret
"Factory Physics" - Hopp and Spearman
"Prices & Production and Other Works" & "Road to Serfdom" - FA Hayek
"Capital and Production" - Richard von Strigl
"Atlas Shrugged" - Ayn Rand
09/28/2012 12:46 PM
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KyleMeyers
Kyle Meyers



Depending on your company's structure, Made to Order Lean is a great book. Plenty of practical ideas for high mix, low volume environments.
09/28/2012 12:46 PM
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VASWarehouse
Chris Palmer



Our organization went through years of tool focused training and application, but it always seemed there was a better future state just beyond our grasp. Recognizing this, we began our book club specifically focusing on individual leadership. After many internal book reviews from some very dedicated folks, we settled on Leadership and Self Deception, and the sequel The Anatomy of Peace from the Arbinger Institute. Neither are Lean books, rather, they are books about recognizing your ability to lead - or more importantly - your ability as a leader to undermine what you think you really want.

This series prepared formal and informal leaders for the open and honest conversations needed to truly transform a business.

Since the first series, we've moved back into more lean management focused books instead of tool based books. With the personal focus of the first series, the following series have been much more effective than in the past.

We know now that tool implementation is the easy part of lean. Creating a culture where lean thinking is rewarded is the truly transformational (but much more difficult) part of the lean journey.

Other books in our reading list:
Tribal Leadership - Logan, King, Fischer-Wright
Managing to Learn - Shook
Creating a Lean Culture - Mann
The Dog Poop Initiative - Weisler
Change the Culture Change the Game - Connors, Smith
It's Your Ship - Abrashoff
10/09/2012 02:00 PM
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Feng
Wang Feng



Yes, Be lean not do lean!
11/13/2012 01:55 PM
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245455
David Whisman



Hi Tiffany,

I am planning to start a lean book club at Liberty Mutual and was wondering if yours got off the ground and how it was going? If you are willing to share, please contact me at David.Whisman@LibertyMutual.com

Thank you,

Dave
11/15/2012 11:50 AM
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22767
Sam Tomas



Besides all the current books that talk about Lean tools and techniques, there are many more that describe business improvement trends that have taken place over the past years. Lean is only one approach in this search by companies for ways to achieve their corporate goals of increased profitability and growth.

The attached lists are not inclusive of every good book that's ever been written, but rather, it includes some of the more popular books of the past that described the then current trend in company profitability improvement aproaches.

It may be in the not to distant future that Lean becomes just another trend that was superceded by some newer profitable improvement techniques.

Sam Tomas


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01/02/2013 09:54 AM
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MwislonCSS
Tony Ferraro



Hi Tiffany!

First, congratulations on completing two years of Lean training. This is a great idea to keep current on Lean tatics etc by having a book club. Remember it takes higher managment's commitment to keep a lean focus.

There are a couple places I suggest you to go and download some free guides that you may find some more useful information. They provide free 5s, kaizen, and other manufacturing guides.

Free Guide Links:
5sToday
Create Safety Supply
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