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Articles (479) Show All »
Managing Workflow—the Lean Way
By: John Shook, Chairman and CEO, and Alice Lee, executive director, Lean Enterprise Institute | October 21, 2016
The main responsibility of CIOs and other information technology managers is to create an environment for work to flow, according to John Shook, CEO, Lean Enterprise Institute (LEI) and Alice Lee, LEI executive director, writing in CIO magazine. More »
Students “Shocked” that Lean Accounting Isn’t More Widespread
By: Chet Marchwinski | October 19, 2016
Lean accounting seemed “so logical” to her students that they asked Professor Pencak, winner of a Lean Education Advancement Foundation scholarship, “Why isn’t everybody doing this?” More »
Case Studies (48) Show All »
Thrustmaster Comes Around
By: David Drickhamer | November 23, 2016
The following Lean Enterprise Institute case study reveals how Thrustmaster of Texas successfully adopted lean thinking and practices to make sustainable improvements in a short period of time, and how other manufacturers of highly engineered, low-volume products can follow their lead using the Lean Transformation Framework. More »
Manufacturing Balancing Act: Pull Versus ERP
By: Chet Marchwinski | September 23, 2016
In this follow-up story to our case study about Phase 2 Medical Manufacturing, Inc.  , the company faces an enviable dilemma: because the lean transformation has spurred strong sales growth, Phase 2 needs a new or expanded parts warehouse. Instead, it expands the pull system by connecting the plan-for-every-part database that underpins one-piece flow production with the enterprise resource planning system, typically associated with big batch production. More »
Columns (640) Show All »
What are the key traits I should look for in a potential Chief Engineer? A Q&A with Katrina Appell
By: Katrina Appell | February 22, 2017
The Chief Engineer is a key cornerstone of lean product and process development. Katrina Appell has been asked many times what traits a potential CE should have in order to ensure the best chance of success. Her answer may surprise you - read more and find out what you should really ask yourself before accepting applications. More »
Accelerating Justice with Lean Forensics
By: Heather Jamieson | February 16, 2017
One of our most popular subjects on The Lean Post is the use of lean in unorthodox places. But one gemba that we have yet to discuss on the Post is crime laboratories. You might be surprised to learn that they are prime candidates for lean transformations, being the process-heavy environments they are. Heather Jamieson explains. More »
eLetters (433) Show All »
Does lean change how you think about business?
By: Ballé, Michael | February 13, 2017
Columns; eLetters
Dear Gemba Coach I can see that lean changes how one thinks about business, but can’t quite put my finger on it. If you had to sum up the main changes in thinking, what would they be? More »
A Thriving Community of Practice - Book Report
By: John Shook | February 7, 2017
Columns; eLetters
I am often asked why the “lean movement” has outlasted so many business improvement movements that have come and gone. For some ad hoc thoughts in response to interview questions in that regard, check out my conversation with Roberto Priolo at Planet Lean. Surely one sign of the health of any community is the continuing evolution of theory and practice. Read more. More »
Forms and Templates (18) Show All »
Problem Definition Worksheet
By: Lean Transformations Group | June 17, 2013
In order to continuously improve, you must be able to find problems in order to solve them.  Once you have found a problem, the first step you must take is to make sure you have properly defined the problem. One way to look at problems (i.  e.  , gaps) is to think in terms of standards. A gap can exist between current performance and an established standard or a new standard that you are attempting to achieve. A problem also can be unwanted variation in performance even when average performance appears acceptable. When even a single out-of-specification event is a More »
Root Cause Template
By: Shook, John and David Verble | June 13, 2013
When trying to solve a problem, you want to identify underlying causes, which will help you to prevent fires rather than just extinguish them. By identifying the underlying causes down to the root causes, you can reduce the likelihood that a given problem will recur. The most common root-cause analysis technique in lean is the "Five Why's.  " This is practice of asking why repeatedly whenever a problem is encountered in order to get beyond the obvious symptoms to discover the root cause. For instance, Taiichi Ohno gives this example about a machine that stopped working (Ohno 1988, p. 17): Why More »
Videos and Webinars (32) Show All »
Webinar: How to Lead With Respect
September 9, 2014
How to Lead With Respect webinar featuring Michael Ballé More »
Webinar: The Two Basic Forms of Coaching for Lean
May 22, 2014
The Two Basic Forms of Coaching for Lean with David Verble More »