Lean Healthcare Transformation Summit 2016
Agenda Speakers Pre-Summit Workshops Hotel & Logistics

Workshops: $800/$1600 USD
$600/$1200 for conference attendees

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Lean Transformation Pre-Summit Workshops

For those who want to make the most of this opportunity, we are offering Pre-Summit Workshops Jun 13-14. These in-depth programs will help move you beyond individual "tools" and isolated improvement projects to build leadership capabilities and develop management skills needed to create the complete lean enterprise and a culture of problem solving. There is a 25% discount on Pre-Summit Workshops for Summit attendees.
Breakfast is served daily at 7:00 AM and workshops begin at 8:00 AM.
Monday Tuesday
A3 Thinking
Lead With Respect: Practicing Respect For People To Enable Engagement, Teamwork & Accountability Sold Out
Value Stream Improvement
Coaching Problem-Solving in Huddles and Continuous Improvement Team Meetings Sold Out Building Effective Coaching Relationships with Leaders Sold Out
Creating a Lean Management System Creating a Lean Management System (repeated) Sold Out
The Building Blocks of Enterprise Excellence Accelerating Your Transformation with The Shingo Model Implementing Rolling Forecasts in Healthcare

Price:
$1200 (summit attendees)
$1600 (workshop only)
Mon-Tue, Jun 13-14
8:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Instructor:

Margie Hagene Margie Hagene

A3 Thinking (2 Days)

Do you envision every employee in your organization using the scientific method for problem solving in their daily work?  Can the operational leaders in your organization teach and coach others how to practice this way of thinking?

As organizations adopt the scientific method for problem solving, they also adopt the A3 template as a way to document their thinking.  However, the A3 is much more than that.  The template, and the thinking it represents, is a foundational element of a lean journey. Practicing the use of the A3 fosters communication among stakeholders, alignment to strategic goals, and buy-in around countermeasures to a problem.

Moreover, the A3 functions as a tool for change management, project management, human development, and knowledge sharing. During this learning experience, participants apply the thinking behind the A3 to a problem in their work areas and learn and practice how to coach coworkers for improvement. 

Key objectives for participants:

  • Explain the requirements of sound A3 thinking and management following progressive stages of learning
  • Recognize the thought process behind the various sections of the A3 template.
  • Develop all the sections of the A3 for an organization problem.
  • Practice coaching for improvement and use feedback from peers and faculty. 

Who Should Attend: Clinical and nonclinical leaders across the healthcare industry


Price:
$600 (summit attendees)
$800 (workshop only)
Tue, Jun 14
8:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Instructor:

David Verble David Verble

Building Effective Coaching Relationships with Leaders

Many healthcare organizations are focusing on building problem-solving capacity in their staff as a way to improve delivery, quality, safety, and cost of patient care. Many coaches assigned to this task have encountered a special challenge in this role: advising managers and senior leaders on how to behave in supportive ways at employee problem-solving meetings and reviews. To overcome this challenge, a special type of relationship must be built – one that creates a “space” in which coaching upward is possible.

This workshop will introduce skills and procedures and give you the chance to practice leading three critical activities for building productive coaching relationships:

  1.  Contracting to create the “shared space” of the agreements and common understandings that promote trust in a coaching relationship
  2. Facilitating self-directed development planning
    • Listening to yourself to be a better leader and coach: a self-assessment
    • Exploring the links: assumptions, habits, behaviors, impact
    • Experimenting with self-directed changes in behavior for different results
  3. Facilitating reflection in which  coachees create their own meaning of the outcomes of their experiments with new skills and behavior

As a basis for this approach to non-directive coaching, you will also explore a research-based coaching model that has been proven most effective in making significant behavioral changes.

Be prepared to share your challenges in coaching a manager or senior leader with another participant, who will be your coach in the three practice activities.

Following this session, participants should be able to:

  • Describe research based coaching models and skills
  • Practice leading activities for building productive coaching relationships
  • Evaluate challenges in coaching with another participant in practice activities

Price:
$600 (summit attendees)
$800 (workshop only)
Mon, Jun 13
8:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Instructor:

David Verble David Verble

Coaching Problem-Solving in Huddles and Continuous Improvement Team Meetings

As more service and industrial companies emphasize continuous improvement (CI) activities by teams of associates and staff at huddle boards or in Rapid Improvement Events (RIEs), pressure is increasing on team leaders and CI facilitators to deliver better and better results.

If you are a leader, process owner, manager, or CI professional responsible for leading and coaching in huddles and RIE teams, this workshop will help you reach the next level of success, which depends on precisely identifying problems and using rapid experiments to uncover root causes.

Following this session, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize and describe problems with the clarity and precision required for effective and sustainable problem solving, based on the scientific method of plan-do-check-act.
  • Identify the waste and problems in work flows that are the major contributors to performance issues in delivering quality services and products.
  • Identify how to ask open inquiry questions to help team members become more aware of their problem-solving habits and develop the skills they need to become more effective problem-solving thinkers.
  • Recognize when teams are using assumptions or jumping to conclusions so you can ask the right questions to slow them down and avoid mistakes and delays.
  • Demonstrate how to be a more effective coach by avoiding the common pitfall of unconsciously taking over the problem-solving thinking from the team.
  • Explain problem solving in a way that both engages associates and staff while delivering the business improvement goals of your organizations.

Bring a Problem

Bring examples of the problem statements and improvement ideas you typically lead teams in working with.  Discussions and practice activities will involve exploring techniques and skills for facilitating effective problem solving thinking using these examples.  The aim of this session is to increase your capability and confidence in performing in your critical and demanding continuous improvement role.

Who Should Attend: Team leaders, process owners, managers, or CI professionals responsible for leading and coaching in huddles and RIE teams


Price:
$600 (summit attendees)
$800 (workshop only)
Mon, Jun 13
8:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Instructor:

Kim Barnas Kim Barnas

Creating a Lean Management System

Is your organization struggling to sustain improvement gained through the application of lean principles? Are you facing challenges to implementing daily improvement and aligning work to strategic goals? 

Managing a lean organization requires a different type of leadership and a shift from management-by-objectives to management-by-process.  This education experience describes how leaders can become thoughtful problem solvers who engage frontline staff in continuous daily improvement, while focusing and aligning their team’s efforts toward true north.

Key objective for participants include:

  • Explain the purpose behind the ten interconnected components of a lean management system
  • Describe how to cascade information effectively throughout the organization
  • Identify how to create and sustain a system of continuous improvement aligned with strategic goals
  • Discuss how employee coaching and mentoring can occur on a daily basis
  • Build standard work for executives in gemba to support daily continuous improvement
  • Understand how employee coaching and mentoring can occur on a daily basis.  

Who Should Attend: Clinical and nonclinical senior leaders with experience applying lean principles in their organizations


Price:
$600 (summit attendees)
$800 (workshop only)
Tue, Jun 14
8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Creating a Lean Management System (repeated)

Is your organization struggling to sustain improvement gained through the application of lean principles? Are you facing challenges to implementing daily improvement and aligning work to strategic goals? 

Managing a lean organization requires a different type of leadership and a shift from management-by-objectives to management-by-process.  This education experience describes how leaders can become thoughtful problem solvers who engage frontline staff in continuous daily improvement, while focusing and aligning their team’s efforts toward true north.

Key objective for participants include:

  • Explain the purpose behind the ten interconnected components of a lean management system
  • Describe how to cascade information effectively throughout the organization
  • Identify how to create and sustain a system of continuous improvement aligned with strategic goals
  • Discuss how employee coaching and mentoring can occur on a daily basis
  • Build standard work for executives in gemba to support daily continuous improvement
  • Understand how employee coaching and mentoring can occur on a daily basis.  

Who Should Attend: Clinical and nonclinical senior leaders with experience applying lean principles in their organizations


Price:
$600 (summit attendees)
$800 (workshop only)
Tue, Jun 14
8:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Instructor:

Steve Player Steve Player

Implementing Rolling Forecasts in Healthcare

Has your organization decided to eliminate the budget but is struggling to fully implement forecasting?

Lean organizations require a planning process that focuses on agility and support for the overall management approach. Many healthcare organizations have adopted rolling forecasts in conjunction with using the 12 Beyond Budgeting principles to replace traditional budgeting practices. Whether your organization is ready to make that move or merely evaluating better planning approaches, this course will help you become more effective in planning to support your lean initiatives.

Following this session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the key symptoms of forecasting illness experienced when forecasting is done incorrectly and how these can be overcome
  • Explain the dos and don’ts of rolling forecasts to establish effective approaches
  • Prepare your organizational ship to make ready for a successful forecasting journey
  • Develop a diamond level forecasting process
  • Develop advanced forecasting practices such as scenario planning and predictive logic diagrams

Who Should Attend: CFOs, controllers, directors of financial planning and accounting, senior leadership team members, and lean implementation leaders


Price:
$1200 (summit attendees)
$1600 (workshop only)
Mon-Tue, Jun 13-14
8:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Instructor:

Mike Orzen Mike Orzen

Lead With Respect: Practicing Respect For People To Enable Engagement, Teamwork & Accountability (2 Days)

Building a great organization requires effective leadership. It turns out that leadership skills can be learned. A key element that is often misunderstood is what it means to lead with respect. This learning session explores why leading with respect is essential in a successful transformation, what respect looks like in practice, and how it impacts your people to drive lasting change for the better. 

The session provides an in-depth review of the model introduced in the book, Lead with Respect, a novel of lean practice, by Michael and Freddy Balle’ and was developed in collaboration with Professor Balle’. 

Leading with respect involves awareness of our focus and intention, and how well we are connecting with people to create an environment of mutual trust and sustained high levels of performance. This is accomplished through the application of 7 core practices:

  • Go and See for Yourself: a primary skill of Lead with Respect is going to the gemba, where value is created, to see with your own eyes to begin to deeply understand the work environment, processes, products, services, and, most importantly, the obstacles your people face everyday. This foundational practice is the basis of showing respect and standing in their shoes to genuinely understand.
  • Creating a Meaningful Challenge: a key to getting people to work together is to agree on the problem before disagreeing about solutions. Rather than setting fixed goal posts and objectives, “challenge” is about highlighting specific improvement dimensions in any job. The art and persistence of challenging brings an influx of energy and constructive tension to get teams focused on the right problems they need to solve.
  • Effective Listening: challenges exist because of very real barriers preventing people from doing what we want and need to accomplish. Listening means standing in their shoes and looking through their eyes until one understands the point of view the employee is expressing and the reality the obstacles have to them. Listening also means actively going to the gemba, pointing out physical facts, and trying simple ideas right away so that people deflate obstacles and focus more on facts.
  • Teaching and Coaching: the heart of people development in lean is problem-based learning. Problem solving can be taught by teaching how to define a problem as a gap with a standard (or an ideal state), how to grasp the situation by examining factors one by one with quick experiments, how to set a target for improvement, how to ask “why?” repeatedly and seek root cause, how to imagine alternative ways of working, pick one and complete it, how to evaluate the outcome to draw the right conclusions, and then establish the right standards to stabilize the countermeasure and move on to the next problem. This is the kind of learning that generates real behavior change and higher levels of performance.
  • Supporting Others: the practice ofdaily kaizen, and supporting people while they experiment with continuous process improvement, is the key to creating a kaizen culture. Daily kaizen is a natural offshoot of visual control as teams see for themselves where the process is going awry and work at getting it back to standard. Both visual control driven kaizen and improvement driven kaizen need to be supported by management stepping in and showing an interest by highlighting problems and clearing obstacles, as well as recognizing and reinforcing the effort of employees committing to daily kaizen.
  • Fostering Teamwork: teamwork is the individual skill of working with others across borders. Teamwork starts by respecting another’s opinion and trying hard to understand their point of view (which doesn’t always mean agreeing). Teamwork requires shared objectives. Teamwork also means knowing how to separate the person from the problem - being tough on the problem without placing blame so that a genuine win-win space can emerge.
  • Learning as a Leader: a key Lead With Respect skill is to learn to plant in local kaizen efforts the seeds of answers to the larger overall business challenges considered during the Challenge practice. Learning means leaders discerning new ways of seeing the business so that, in solving detailed work problems, they learn to see and discover what topics matter most to the business’ future development. Leaders learn to appreciate others’ experience and perspectives and discover what others have to teach them. Lastly, they learn how to enable growth in others. 

Driving outcomes centered on Results & Relationships:

Effective leadership requires a dual focus: achieve great results through great behavior. Fostering the right behavior in others requires solid relationships built on trust, respect, transparency, and consistency. The results you need to achieve can only be reached through the efforts of your people. As your people learn new skills, and together with leaders, build a workplace that enables and supports the courage and vulnerability required to learn, practice, and master the core practices of Lead with Respect, results and healthy relationships with workers, customers, and suppliers are natural outcomes. 

Following this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the 7 practices of Lead with Respect
  • Apply Lead With Respect principles to their daily work
  • Practice Lead with Respect concepts with their colleagues
  • Examine how to manage their personal journey of development and growth utilizing Lead with Respect practices

Benefits: 

Through instruction, small group discussions, and hands-on exercises, session participants will: 

  1. Understand how to apply the 7 practices of Lead with Respect
  2. Learn by doing through a series of exercises and breakouts
  3. Leave the workshop with a personal plan of growth and practice
  4. Return to work with a new paradigm of Leadership 

Who Should Attend: Senior Leaders, Managers, Improvement Deployment Leaders & Lean Champions and Lean and CI Practioners of all levels


Price:
$600 (summit attendees)
$800 (workshop only)
Mon, Jun 13
8:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Instructor:

Jake Raymer Jake Raymer

The Building Blocks of Enterprise Excellence Accelerating Your Transformation with The Shingo Model

Is your organization “stuck” in a whirlwind of activity of tool utilization, struggling to sustain desired long-term behavior and performance results?  

This learning experience provides a practical method and a framework to accelerate world-class organization performance and operational excellence through the appropriate application of lean principles, systems and tools. Participants will explore two architectural methods for improvement: 1. Tool-based architecture, and 2. Principle-based architecture.  Both are necessary in the evolution of culture.

Few organizations build on what they have previously learned – that tools alone are not enough, that people need to understand the ‘WHY’ behind the ‘HOW,’ or the “principle-based architecture” behind a lean transformation.   During this one-day program participants will learn from other healthcare organizations that are making this similar transition.  We will reflect on key questions such as:

  • How should we be achieving these results and with what behavior?
  • How do we sustain long-term behavior & performance results?
  • If champion leadership rotated to other areas, would there be backsliding of improvement gains?

In this session, you will discover the key concepts behind the Shingo model, which has guided lean transformation in many industries for more than 25 years, and is now being applied in healthcare. You will also understand why lean transformations are about more than the application of tools – they are about transforming the culture.

Following this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the benefit of focusing on principle-driven behavior
  • Identify and create key behavior indicators (KBI)
  • Discuss the evolution and integration of tools, systems, and principles
  • Create a roadmap of next steps

Who Should Attend:  Clinical and non-clinical healthcare professionals


Price:
$1200 (summit attendees)
$1600 (workshop only)
Mon-Tue, Jun 13-14
8:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Instructors:

Tom Shuker Tom Shuker

Judy Worth Judy Worth

Value Stream Improvement (2 Days)

While many organizations have learned how to create current-state maps as a snapshot of their existing processes, many struggle with creating a future-state map of their value streams. All too often, the future-state map is just a drawing of a preconceived solution rather than the result of a rigorous lean thinking process. In addition, even fewer organizations are able to truly sustain a system-level problem solving effort during and beyond implementation.

This interactive workshop will utilize case studies to take you through EVERY step of the value-stream improvement process: preparation before mapping, current-state mapping, problem solving to design the future state, managing implementation of a lean transformation to plan, and continuing to support the value stream after implementation. Attendees are encouraged to join this workshop regardless of industry, as there will be several case studies provided to allow participants to examine the one most relevant to their industry.

Course Outline

  • Fundamentals of Lean Thinking
    • An overview of lean thinking and what it means for an organization to be lean
  • Identifying waste in non-production value streams
    • The 7 types of waste and what they might  look like in various processes
  • Scoping a value-stream improvement project (based on a case study)
    • Aligning leadership and gaining agreement on the goals and objectives of the project
    • Identifying key stakeholders and the participants of the implementation team
  • Drawing a current-state map
    • Understanding a value-stream map and the metrics that support the transformation
    • Use of the value-stream mapping tool to document and analyze a current-state map
  • Identifying the changes necessary to create a future-state map with a current-state map
  • Using lean tools to create a future-state map that addresses identified problems and achieves project objectives. 
  • Planning, implementing, and managing value-stream improvement using the Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle (PDCA)

Outcomes

Following this session participants will be able to:

  • Use fundamental lean mapping tools to identify and address issues in the value stream
  • Plan and implement a lean value-stream improvement project to achieve sustainable gains
  • Identify a project’s anticipated improvements in performance and communicate them to leadership to secure alignment

Who Should Attend

  • Managers, supervisors, lean coordinators, and change agents from any industry with multi-step processes, particularly (though not exclusively) those struggling to implement value-stream changes
  • Leaders who want to learn the principles and techniques for value-stream improvement in order to be more effective in developing problem-solving capabilities