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Topic Title: Setting up a Moonshine Shop
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Created On: 02/21/2008 02:43 PM
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02/28/2008 08:36 AM
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PatR
Pat Remillard



I am seting up a moonshine shop in our factory. I want to assign a maintenance man full-time. I also want to rotate "helpers" through the moonshine shop depending on the area that we are looking at.

Ours is a union environment; there is a maintenance department, but never any sort of internal "custom fixture" shop in the past.

Has anyone else started one "from scratch"?
What are your lessons learned looking back?

P
03/03/2008 02:57 PM
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SetupGuy
Thomas Warda



Pat,

We set one of these up some time ago and I might be able to offer some advice. The first thing you need to look at is who will run / work in this kind of shop. What you need are creative people. The ones who usually won on Junkyard Wars would be good candidates here because they were able to create stuff that actually worked out of junk. What you don't want are "Catalog Engineers" who only know how to buy a solution.

Next, when it comes to equipping your shop, keep it basic. A Drill Press, Belt Sander, Lathe, Mill and some simple hand power tools are about all you want for facilities. You'll also need a basic supply of hardware (nuts, bolts, washers, etc.) available for ready use as well as some basic raw materials. Generally speaking, the more you spend here, the less creativity you'll get out of it. Oh, and make sure these folks have access to the company scrap bins too!
03/06/2008 11:22 AM
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69317D2
Brent Jorgenson



I was a project manager of a moonshine shop (staff of 100) for several years in one of my previous experiences. In our organization we hired the most creative machine designers and the most creative maintenance people. We took on machines that were very risky in terms of their development. We built vertical machines, zero setup machines, and small right sized equipment. This area gave us a competitive advantage that the competition could not duplicate.

Here is a summary of some critical elements to make sure the area is successful:
    Have creative risk takers throughout all levels in the area
    Make sure your company is willing to spend money on high risk development projects that could end in failure
    Separate the area and function from other areas of your facility
    Integrate this area with your Process Design Kaizens - They need to be involved in this effort to work with the teams and fully understand their concepts
    Focus this area on developing equipment that will give a significant competitive advantage - zero setup, right sized equipment that can be inlined, lower capital costs, equipment designed to deliver better quality, etc.


E-mail with any other questions - brentjorgenson@leansupermarket.com
03/06/2008 11:22 AM
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duecesevenOS
Kris Hallan



This sounds interesting to me but I've never heard of a "moonshine shop" before. What is it exactly?
03/06/2008 11:23 AM
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MarkRosenthal
Mark Rosenthal



I will chime in on Tom (hi Tom!) and add that it is also important to nurture the people. They need to learn rigorous application of the 3P (or similar) methodology, and understand the critical importance of "trystorming" with mock-ups and other techniques to explore as many ideas as possible.

"Always start with Cardboard Cad" before things get into formal design (if they ever do).
03/09/2008 09:16 PM
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Swift195
Subbarao Gunnam



A place where ideas are distilled and turned into working models in short order.

Hope this helps!
03/09/2008 09:16 PM
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MarkRosenthal
Mark Rosenthal



To answer Kris' question - a "moonshine shop" is generally an area where people apply high levels of technical creativity to construct the machines and equipment that support people producing one-piece-flow at takt. They typically produce custom equipment that is focused on a narrow problem. They apply the 3P process of "trystorming" simulation to prove concepts, and quickly assembling something that works.

The term "Moonshine" comes from Shingijutsu's Nakao-sensei (senior). He emphasized that this effort should be in the shadows to maximize their creativity without having every move scrutinized by the accountants. (For those readers not from the USA, "moonshine" is a slang term for illegal whiskey, usually produced in a home-made still in the woods where the tax agents are unlikely to find it)

A good moonshine shop can repay its expenses many times over every year in savings and in costs never incurred. It can drop your capital equipment cost requirement by an order of magnitude.
03/14/2008 10:51 AM
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duecesevenOS
Kris Hallan



Cool stuff. I'm really curious about this concept because it sounds like another one of those things that we really need. Anybody have any good references on this or case studies?

All I have found so far is Boeing's example shop where they took some old farm equipment and made it better.
08/11/2019 09:19 PM
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CesarFlores
Cesar Flores Payan



Hi I have some experience in Moonshine implementation
I implemented it in three large companies in Juarez Mexico such as Flextronics, Foxconn and Robert BOSCH with great and documented results.
If someone requires information You can contact me without problem, and I can share my experience with pleasure.

I have a list of tools used for a start up.

And savings documented in more than $500,000.00 USD in less than 3 years.

e-mail: cesarsfp@hotmail.com
09/06/2019 09:35 AM
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257024
Jason Baker



Excellent answer and spot-on.
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