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Topic Title: Kaizen Event vs TPM Event
Topic Summary: Differences
Created On: 05/06/2011 09:52 AM
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05/09/2011 09:23 AM
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18045
Robert Cenek



I have several people in our company who insist that TPM Events and Kaizen Events are synonymous terms. I see both as forms of kaizen, but in my mind they employ different methods for arriving at improvement, and are directed at two different things - process vs. equipment. Somewhat of an exercise in mental gymnastics - but curious for other opinions on the topic.
05/09/2011 11:31 AM
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SetupGuy
Thomas Warda



Probably not worth debating because in truth, neither one should be an "event." Each should be an intense burst of focused activity, but both should be incremental progress toward a future state.

Tom
05/10/2011 11:16 AM
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Boeing_Lean
Ken Hunt



I agree with Tom. An "event" indicates that you do something and then you're done. In either casethat you are addressing, you should be continually making process improvement gains via PDCA.
05/11/2011 10:02 AM
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SetupGuy
Thomas Warda



I probably owe you a few more words on the differences and similarities of TPM and Kaizen "events." (It still hurts to use that word though.) In actual execution, our Kaizens and TPM activities do look somewhat similar. As I've said, they're both intense bursts of focused activity, so they've got a good deal of similarity there. In our Kaizens, we're generally focused on improving the operation of a process. The common measures we're trying to improve are quality, rate per hour, work balance, etc. Following the Kaizen, there is always some amount of effort needed to maintain the gains.

In our TPM activities, we kick off the effort for a specific piece of equipment or process with a focused effort that shuts the process down, does at least the first two of the five S's and brings the machine back up to spec / standard on all operational parameters. But we also add a whole bunch of Operator / Maintenance interaction where the two groups really learn both how the machine is run and how it needs to be maintained. We then turn over some of the day to day checks to the operators since they now understand how important they are to the actual maintenance of the machine. The common measures we're trying to improve are quality, downtime, mean time between failures, etc. And just like our Kaizens, there is a certain amount of follow up activity required to maintain the gains.

So I guess if one looks at both our Kaizens and our TPM activities from a distance, they do look pretty similar. They both focus on improving both the process and the people who run it. They both start with a focused, intense burst of activity. They both require follow on effort to be successful. They are however subtly different. Hope that helps.

Tom
05/13/2011 08:54 AM
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Stuart Veitch



Hi Tom and Robert

In TPM there are 8 pillars, one of which is autonomous maintenance and one of which is focused improvement. The autonomous maintenance activity is a 7 step programme that integrates into normal work, that is opertors taking ownership for their equipment through cleaning, inspection, lubrication and tightening and supported by the planned maintenance function. The step 1 initial clean is often started with an event, but this should become a standard/routine meeting an activity.

Focused improvement is an ad hoc improvement activity to eliminate a particular loss. Here a team is brought together to follow a structured improvement route usually based on PDCA. After the team have worked and found solutions these are typically locked in place by the autonomous teams and/or planned maintenance teams.

These two types of activity are quite different but link together. The autonomous maintenance work is to maintain and do small improvements often based on tags and reducing the cleaning time, the focused improvment work is to eliminate loss through data driven teams.

Hope this helps in some way.
Stuart
05/13/2011 06:38 PM
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LeanSpec
Dave Kippen



With no disrespect to the previous posts, I believe it is much simpler that that. TPM, the way I understand it, is Total Productive Maintenance. Kaizen is "a change for the better". An event is a focused period in which you do something. A Kaizen event is any event where you focus on improving anything. We have TPM events, 5S events, Flow events, Hijunka events etc.

Even simpler: Kaizen is general, TPM (or other Lean tools) are specific.
11/13/2017 03:27 PM
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345289
Carlos Lopez



Hello everyone, I am new to most of this.... I do however am very curious about all of it. I want to do an "event" but I dont know how to go about it. we do not have a set standard or written procedure on how to do a TPM event... where could i find this info?
11/17/2017 10:16 AM
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Mike_Thelen
Michael Thelen



TPM is the focus, Kaizen is the standard or procedure. There are slightly different versions of conducting kaizen events, but all accomplish the same goal. If you'd like more information on the procedure itself, drop me a note at mike.thelen@stfmail.com. I can share what we developed with help from our Toyota mentors and then used globally.
02/08/2018 01:35 PM
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Michael Meehan



There are a lot of publications out there about TPM. Many larger corporations have developed their own process for TPM implementation with the aid of consultants. A book I have found helpful is "Pratical TPM" by Leflar and published by Productivity Press. It was written by a group at Agilent Semiconductor about their actual implementation journey.
02/26/2018 09:22 PM
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MwislonCSS
Tony Ferraro



Have you ever thought about implementing Gemba? This is a great strategy that will continuously help improve processes and look for areas of improvement. If your unfamiliar with Gemba here is an article I that I wrote recently that might help explain Gemba: https://www.creativesafetysupply.com/articles/gemba/
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