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Topic Title: First VSM in a manufacturing
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Created On: 12/30/2015 12:28 AM
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01/04/2016 07:26 AM
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SaltanatNK
Saltanat Nigmetova



Hello,
I hope you can find time to answer my questions.
I've started working as a lean specialist in a manufacturing company that produces plastic pipes and fittings. I am new to lean but trying to learn and implement things in here. We started implementing 5S in some areas; we did standard time calculation for manual operator work, also started studying changeover closely to reduce c/o time, and now want to do VSM.

Most of our products are done in one machine (injection molding machine or extruder). Only some have assembly work. So, if we decide to take a product family which requires an injection molding and then packaging only, we consider them as one processing station, right? (Packaging is done by the same operator controlling the injection molding machine straight after the product has fallen from the machine and while the second cycle is being done) When calculating inventory, do we calculate all the raw material although it is used in many products, not just the one we are doing VSM for? Or do we take the percentage needed for that specific product? or product family? Also for WIP, is it only WIP of the particular product or the whole product family? How can I get raw material inventory for a particular product? The thing is that Raw M. will be used for the product that was ordered and not kept for a specific product in general.


We have seasonal demand. Therefore, the CEO wants us to work now (not season) and save stock in order to prepare for the season when the production might have hard time meeting the demand. Now, we have raw materials and space to store things. Also, we started to keep stock of C type products in order to reduce number of changeovers during the season. How correct is it?

Lean is something new in this company. I am the only person responsible for lean initiative. My boss also knows about it and supports it but other managers, workers (some do), executives do not really know or accept it. So, I need to show good results in order to convince people and get them involved. What can you advise me to do, to get quick benefits of Lean?

P.S. I could not attach a draft VSM. Does anyone know how to attach pictures?
10/12/2017 02:55 PM
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40183
Lonnie Wilson



Hello Saltanat....it is not clear why you are doing 5S, vsms or SMED. It looks like you have taken the approach that "to implement lean is to start using the tools of lean". this is a common approach and is seldom, if ever the correct approach. The "means to lean" is to: problem solve your way to the Ideal state; through the total elimination of waste; using a fully engaged workforce. so start with the Ideal State and if you don't have that, find a major production problem that needs solving. Then use the lean tools you will need to fix that problem. You seem to be highly motivated to make this work at your facility, if you would like to discuss this further, please feel free to call my cell in 915-203-4141. And to you and the moderator, do not construe this as a sales pitch, I am here to help...short and sweet. Be well, Lonnie
10/12/2017 02:55 PM
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BharatM
Bharat Mimani



Hi Saltanat,
Personally, I think you are moving too fast. 5S & VSM are advanced tools of Lean Mfg. Implementing 5S alone should take 6-9 months for an organization, which is very efficient. Do you get the approximate that I am talking about?
Have you already balanced your inventory? What is the status of SMED? How much does Change Over cost you in terms of total resources? What is your manpower loading, efficiency & up-time? Is TPM implemented? My guesstimate is based on your one comment - "other managers, workers (some do), executives do not really know or accept it". Had TPM been successfully implemented, you should not have had any problems in selling Lean. Remember, Lean is not a method, it's a culture. A mindset.
I help organizations practice Lean, but prior to implementing Lean, there is so much more to do. If you need more insights & advice, drop me a PM. I shall revert.
Luck.
Bharat
10/16/2017 10:08 PM
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mihaela
Muntianu Mihaela



Hello,
I've started working for 2 month in a manufacturing company that produces hydraulic pumps from Romania. I'll have to planning production and controI that I planning for aluminium parts. I don't know the parts but I see that everything is chaotic. And the big problem I think is the employees.The operators work at 2 or 3 cnc station(3 shifts) and they are not technically trained....and they want just money. There are many delays,many west of time (the cycle time is ok but is many waste of time)we don't have any soft,the cnc are mostly new.
I don't know how can I start to improve the production,how to start the organization
10/16/2017 10:08 PM
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PeteConnor
Pete Connor



I have to agree with Bahrat,

you need to change the culture within the workplace, get them to 'buy in' to what you are striving to achieve.

You need the managers to work with you, otherwise you will be fighting an uphill battle.

I have started to implement 5S in my workplace, but I am keeping it as simple as possible (KISS), as many of the the manufacturing team have not been involved with any sort of formal change, and have 'always done it this way'.

I have started with Shine, Sort and Standardise, the other parts of 5S, as long as you keep relaying the message, will fall into place. I am 3 months in, and I can just start to see the signs of people working out where the waste is, and looking for their own ideas to improve.

Search Paul Akers and FastCap on YouTube, he has a very simplistic approach to 5S, but you can certainly use this as a staring place in your environment.

Hope this helps
10/20/2017 09:29 AM
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41674
David Apple



Mihaela
You say the problem is the employees, but from your description the problem is really with management. Management has not provided training for the operators.
I would start by having management commit to adequate training for your operators.
Next, I would do an industrial engineering methods improvement study. 5S will be a big help. Once you make improvements - which should eliminate the obvious waste that you mention - then you conduct a time study to determine what output you can expect.
Next, management must set reasonable and realistic expectations for production output per shift. I say reasonable because you must account for operator inexperience, machine downtime, scrap, and so on.
Last, management must monitor the operations closely and work with operators to determine and solve problems when operators cannot meet expectations.
Best wishes. This is not an easy task.
David
10/20/2017 09:29 AM
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edersonberg
ederson berg



Hi Mihaela,

Well, is a hard question really. How and where can start the improvement process.

A easy way, every time, is talk: the people are the real problem.

Please, make this question again for yourself.

All business has 3P: Product, Process and People.

The product just is possible becouse some people work into some process to make it.

The people is not wrong, You can believe it. The problem is in your process.

Go to gemba! Go see, write step by step. Find the gaps.

Well, I will start a new projet in my company and I have other cases. If you wanna change some ideas about improvemment and kaizens I'll happy for help you.

kind regards,

Berg

+55 54 9 9612 0594
10/20/2017 09:29 AM
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BharatM
Bharat Mimani



Hi Mihaela,
I think you should have started a new thread. You would have obtained more & relevant replies. I am sharing my thoughts with you, though.
Firstly, and honestly, get to know the parts. If you want to control production of a particular part - know everything about it inside out. Get to know the process, the parameters, the technology, problems and solutions. Once you are particularly sure of your product, get to the Industrial Engineering part - which helps you determine the ideal amount of resources required to produce. Subsequently, consult your management and find out the actual amount of resources deployed. This will help you put a number to the additional delta being spent and your knowledge of the part production process will help you plug the drain.
Secondly, all of the above is easier said than done. It takes years of practice and experience. My sincere advice would be to get an expert on board, who can help you diagnose the problems within 3-4 weeks. It will cost you a decent amount of money, but at least you will get to know what your problem is.
Thirdly, before jumping to conclusions of "waste of time", use detailed reports & scientifically prove that there is a waste. Then suggest ways to arrest the wastes.
All of the above are stepping stones of Lean Manufacturing. Each step has multiple scientific tools to be used. But, most importantly, congratulations, for, you have completed the most difficult part - accepting that there is waste. I provide Lean Mfg consulting to a number of organizations. The biggest challenge I face is in making corps agree to a waste problem! Your candid approach may be because of your naivety, but it has worked to your advantage. Stay like this. Godbless.
If you need more assistance, drop me a PM. I shall revert.
Thanks.
Bharat
10/20/2017 09:29 AM
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AzeddineTangier
Tika Azeddine



Mihaela
The concern you have is Management problem and not the operators .If the top management recognize that this statement is true , it will be easy for you to solve all the issues .If not , I think all the actions you can do will have not a big impact in solving the problems you are experiencing .
I can come to you with some suggestions that you can discuss with the top management and start the implementation
11/03/2017 11:17 AM
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345193
Charlie Yo



Hello everybody! :)

I just found this forum. A lot of good advices, thank you.
I'm just starting with my new position as Lean Manager but for now is really hard. There is no planning within company in order/delivery, no information about actual old/new parts, no warehouse management, no shopfloor management and so on. Everything is in 0. Workshops are "on-line" and everything goes somehow but very bad. My task is to implement Lean Culture or for the beginning something. It's about steel plant, continuous casting, and currently I'm in the workshop assembly/disassemlby 5types of rollers. For the start I was thinking about 5s but it's possible to implement part by part.. also they want me to consider that we will add assem/disass for one more type of roller so I should plan by myself where we are going to put that as well. As I can see so far worker are not trained and totally not motivated for the work. Leadership is not the best as well.
I don't know but from my experience maybe too much things for me as a starter in this kind of the industry, I worked with lean but in opposite industries.
Maybe my description is not clear, but with one word I can explain MESS everywhere from the workers to the finished assembly. I really have no idea how to start and from where. I would appreciate if someone can give me advice how to fight with all mess and from where I should start.

Thank you
11/17/2017 10:10 AM
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ChristianS
Christian Sampedro



Charlie, I am sorry to hear about your situation but it sounds like a recipe for disaster.
1. Do you have full leadership commitment? I mean, not only words but actions?
2. As a "Lean Manager", it can't be your responsibility to change the culture, you don't have the means to do that. Anything related to company culture is the responsibility of the CEO. If he/she is not up to the task then the initiative is going to fail (and that is not full commitment). Your job is to coach and challenge your CEO to get the education and become the culture that he wants to build. I have done it and it works (it is actually the only way it works - that I know of).
3. Obtain clarity of purpose. What are you trying to accomplish really? Can you express it in numbers? The cultural transformation is not an end on itself but the means to something greater. It may be efficiency, quality, profits or all of them, make it crystal clear.

Your main responsibility right now should be to change the attitudes of the leadership towards Lean. Sometimes you do that through education, sometimes you take a model area and transform it, but remember that the purpose is not the transformation but to get the attention of the leadership. EVERYBODY should be responsible to embrace Lean, not only you.
11/17/2017 10:10 AM
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TAW
THOMAS WILLIAMS



Charlie;

I've been in your shoes. You've got a tough job ahead of you. It will not go anywhere unless you have the full backing and continuous involvement from top management. Top management must be totally committed and thoroughly believe in the concepts of Lean. It is a culture change that you are looking to achieve; and it's not easy. The Rather than coming from you, the direction must come from the top. It begins with a vision statement, then a mission statement; both of which are widely communicated personally from the top leader. Without any of these you will find yourself constantly fighting an uphill battle with the status quo. Sorry to be so direct, but I've been in this situation twice. Both situations ended in failure. I moved on when I realized that in both instances the company owners were only looking for the "flavor of the month" solutions to their efficiency problems.
11/17/2017 10:10 AM
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Robert_Simonis
Robert Simonis



I recommend you start with layout. Get the processes and material moving in a logical, planned sequence, in defined quantities or at a defined time. A VSM will probably only tell you what you already know, that it is chaos, and the time spent doing the VSM should be spent making change. A process flow diagram, by value stream, will be a much better starting point. This is the first 5S at a high level: identify how much travel, material, and process steps are needed, and in what sequence. Start changes immediately to signal the organization that change is the new normal. Do not wait for perfect. A 70% solution done now is infinitely better than a 100% solution done sometime in the future.
11/17/2017 10:12 AM
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BharatM
Bharat Mimani



Hi Charlie,
Firstly - Start a new thread when posting a new problem! It just helps us keep the forum "lean"!!!
The best place is to start is to get your fundamentals right. Have a proper Industrial Engineering exercise done for defining process(es), tools, equipment, fixtures, etc. On paper, you should have your ideal world and the existing defined in detail!
Once you have that, identify all that is not listed from the IE team. This is pure waste! By experience, I estimate you should have container-fulls of waste. Get rid of it. Next step, organize things. Make sure to keep the morale up while you are conducting all of this. You want your people, team and management to be a part of the change. If they are on board, implementing 5S would be a quick exercise. Maintain a cool composure and never let safety & hygiene be compromised. Steel casting can be dangerous at times! Also, keep IE involved at all times. Make sure resources are redefined with each change in process.
Eventually - you should get close to the following: an ideal workplace which safe & clean, a minimum amount of handling / scrap, optimum number of tools / dies, faster throughput / Lower WIP and many more perks. As it sounds to me, you have an awesome lot of resources and you guys are fairly busy in business. If you haven't organized mfg yet, are constantly occupied, doing sustainable business and have as many resources as you have spelled out - well then, you are blessed; my advice - make hay while the sun shines. Get an expert on board, who can help you fast-track implement the culture of Lean.
We provide Lean transformation services at very affordable rates. Drop me a PM for a detailed interaction.
Regards,
Bharat
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