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Lean Eye Test: Seeing the Work

by Lean Leaper
February 26, 2021

Lean Eye Test: Seeing the Work

by Lean Leaper
February 26, 2021 | Comments (1)

Sometimes, you need to break things down to really understand the complexities of the process.

In this instructional video, there are two methods that produce the same product. But, how do these methods differ? Does one value "respect for people" more than the other? What about the assembly's role in this? Masia Goodman participates in this dual-demo, simplifying the differences in these approaches to work with six key elements, highlighted in the video.

 

 

Also, be sure to check out these other related Posts:

 

  • Respect for People E-Letter by Jim Womack from 2007:
    • "Only by showing mutual respect – each for the other and for each other's role – is it possible to solve problems, make work more satisfying, and move organizational performance to an ever higher level."
  • Lean Roundup: Respect for People Article by Tom Ehrenfeld from 2018:
    • "Practicing respect is an animating force of lean leadership that colors how one coaches and develops people. “The lean ideal for respect is pretty clear: make every effort to understand each other and take responsibility for others’ problems, develop every person’s problem solving autonomy, involve every person in designing their own jobs and managing their own work and partake of the joy of creation when ideas become a reality,” notes Michael Balle in How do You Define Respect for People?. "
  • What is Work? Video by Matt Savas from 2020: 
    • "Just because someone is moving does not mean they are working. So, that begs the question: what is work? It's a combination of two things. First, value-added work, where motion transforms materials and information into something that a customer is willing to pay for."

 

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1 Comment | Post a Comment
EZ February 28, 2021

The culture in our the facilities are a challenge, the day to day is hard and this not allow us to find the time to work joint with our teams in the continuos improvement, and usually we are reacting when the issue blow out in our hands or face, a Corrective Action Plan is asked, but the root cause never is eliminated and again, the day to day come back to us... we need the discipline from our brain to get back to the ground that makes the culture.  This is the mean enemy against we should to struggle in our journey lean.  Thanks for the call out, very interesting.



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Search Posts:
Building a Lean Operating & Management System
Jeff Smith, Jikku Mohan, Karen Gaudet & Masia Goodman
Change That Sustains
Lynn Kelley
Steady Work
By Karen Gaudet
The Birth of Lean: Conversations with the Founders of TPS
By Koichi Shimokawa and Takahiro Fujimoto (Editors)
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