Home > The Lean Post> Getting a Jump on Unplanned Changes

Getting a Jump on Unplanned Changes

by Andrew Quibell
April 28, 2015

Getting a Jump on Unplanned Changes

by Andrew Quibell
April 28, 2015 | Comments (1)

“What when wrong?”

“I don't know! Something changed!”

If I was given a dollar for every time I’ve heard this over my career in automotive I'd be a rich man. Changes happen in manufacturing and the majority of causes to those changes occur in a planned way which means they can be controlled and are known about by the effected parties. But what happens when changes are unplanned and sporadic? What do you do then? Panic? No. Instead, put in place a process to respond to change and escalate unplanned changes in a controlled manner. This is CPM: Change Point Management. 

When you trace back failures or escape points that impact your customer you often associate the failure with some kind of uncontrolled, unknown change point. It’s vitally important to have a mechanism in your business at the point of manufacture to alert people to changes and ensure that they can be controlled in a organized manner by those who are impacted by the unplanned change. 

The story board below is one way I teach folks about CPM and show the very basic process by which you can capture, visualize, communicate, and record changes (and why it's in your best interest to do so). People wonder why they carry so much inefficiency, waste, and scrap. One reason is because they drop the ball on managing or even being aware of unplanned changes which are the hidden causes of the inefficiency and pain they have to suffer. Can you relate your experiences in the workplace to the images and words below? How do you share lean ideas?

https://www.lean.org/images/cpmarch2014.jpg

The views expressed in this post do not necessarily represent the views or policies of The Lean Enterprise Institute.
Search Posts:
Lean Problem Solving
Mike Kobashi, Pascal Dennis, Sammy Obara, Tom Shuker & Tracey Richardson
Problem Solving to Align Purpose, Process and People
Ernie Richardson & Tracey Richardson
The Lean Manager
By Michael Ballé and Freddy Ballé
Was this post... Click all that apply
HELPFUL INTERESTING INSPIRING ACCURATE
7 people say YES
4 people say YES
3 people say YES
3 people say YES
Related Posts
1 Comment | Post a Comment
kevin kobett April 28, 2015
1 Person AGREES with this comment

 

Stories.

The in-process sample was over 100 degree F. Adjustments to the batch were made from this sample. Many adjustments were needed during the shift.

The finished product sample was chilled. It had no strong correlation to the in-process sample. Common to find the finished product sample out of spec.

After the crystallization began, a finished product sample could be taken out of the chilled tubing. The batch took 45 minutes to go thru the process. Normally finished product testing did not occur until all six batches going into the tank were done.

I did not adjust any of the six batches. I did take a chilled sample out of the tubing. If the sample was out-of-spec, adjustments could be made before the batch was done. All batches were mixed together before packaging. During testing, all chilled samples were right on target. The variance between batches was less than 0.10. The variance between the in-process batches was over 0.5 and routinely higher than spec.

I gave me boss all this information to my boss. He said not to tell production or I will be unemployed. He fired most lab techs. Production was blaming its operators for a variability problem that did not exist. The operators were my friends.

What would you have done?

Lean ideas must be shared with a good old fashioned story. This story identifies the company's culture. Now employees have a clear, shared vision to initiate a meaningful discussion. Everyone can look thru my eyes. A lecture will never work.

Some stories are not appropriate for your company. A story with a negative tone can be used by another company. Maybe not yours. Depends if the culprit is still employed.

 



Reply »

Search Posts:
Lean Problem Solving
Mike Kobashi, Pascal Dennis, Sammy Obara, Tom Shuker & Tracey Richardson
Problem Solving to Align Purpose, Process and People
Ernie Richardson & Tracey Richardson
The Lean Manager
By Michael Ballé and Freddy Ballé
Reading the Signs
The Art of Silent Observation
"What Do I Need to Know?"
A Sweeter Type of Lean
Do You Own Your Lean Learning?
Getting Religious About Problem Solving
Learning Through Struggle