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How to Avoid Team Disinterest and Management Disappointment with Huddles

by Lean Leaper
May 5, 2016

How to Avoid Team Disinterest and Management Disappointment with Huddles

by Lean Leaper
May 5, 2016 | Comments (3)

A Video Interview with David Verble

Huddles - the quick, daily, standup discussions lasting a few minutes at a huddle board displaying problems - are increasingly popular. But too often problem-solving in the huddle gets “fast-tracked” in favor of quick identification of problems and acceptance of solutions, according to David Verble, a Toyota veteran and Lean Enterprise Institute (LEI) faculty member.

“The random picking of problems that people in the work flow see doesn’t necessarily add up to the needed improvements in overall results,” says Verble, who teaches LEI’s workshop Coaching Problem Solving in Huddles and Team Meetings

Watch the video to hear David describe huddle hazards and offer advice for keeping your team engaged in effective, disciplined problem solving.

 

 

The views expressed in this post do not necessarily represent the views or policies of The Lean Enterprise Institute.
Keywords:  coaching,  management
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3 Comments | Post a Comment
Carl Watt May 05, 2016

Verble is such a great coach.  Definitely right to say that the problem solving should be a separate stand up meeting effort.  He knows because he has done it.  Thanks for the video!!

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Rob Gregory May 05, 2016
3 People AGREE with this reply

Great topic but it very difficult to hear the speaker.

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Joseph Pesz May 14, 2016
1 Person AGREES with this comment

These interviews are a great idea, but it's time to invest in lav mics or a larger pattern mic so that the quality is usable.

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