Home > Knowledge Center> Why Lean Gets Business Backwards (and why that’s a good thing)

Why Lean Gets Business Backwards (and why that’s a good thing)

10/28/2013

Most executives think their role is to first define a strategy, then the organizational structure needed to implement the strategy, and then the systems needed to sustain the strategy. “And they’ve learned they also need some kind of involvement program,” said Michael Ballé, coauthor of The Lean Manager and The Gold Mine, popular business novels about lean transformations.

Lean takes the opposite approach, according to Ballé, who also writes the Gemba Coach column. “The basic assertion of lean is that if every year you are serious about improving your safety, your quality, your flexibility, and your productivity by involving everybody every day, your strategy will emerge, your organizational structure will set itself right, the systems you need will become apparent, and of course involvement will be built in.”

Watch the short video to learn more about how this impacts you, customers, and suppliers.

Related Content

Books

Articles

  • TPS, the Thinking People System
    The twin pillars of just-in-time and jidoka help support a full model about how to achieve customer satisfaction from employee satisfaction, through teamwork and respect, on a basis of mutual trust between management and employees.
  • How Does Asking Questions Create Change?
    Lean is not a sum of processes to acquire and apply which then will make things magically work better. It’s a set of techniques to visualize delivery processes so everyone understands them at a glance, reveal problems to give opportunities for people to exercise their abilities to think, be creative and utilize their strengths to self-actualize in the course of their work.
  • Seeing the Work of a Daily Management System
    Daily management systems tap visual elements that expose problems, and also use obeyas as thinking spaces for reflecting on broader challenges, says Michael Balle.