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Knowledge Center: Forms and Templates (19)

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The Lean Bakery (Chapter 1)
By: Juan Antonio Tena, Emi Castro | November 14, 2017
Forms and Templates
Chapter 1 from The Lean Bakery book. More »
Problem Definition Worksheet
By: Lean Transformations Group | June 17, 2013
Forms and Templates
In order to continuously improve, you must be able to find problems in order to solve them.  Once you have found a problem, the first step you must take is to make sure you have properly defined the problem.  One way to look at problems (i.  e.  , gaps) is to think in terms of standards. A gap can exist between current performance and an established standard or a new standard that you are attempting to achieve. A problem also can be unwanted variation in performance even when average performance appears acceptable. When even a single out-of-specification event is a More »
Root Cause Template
By: Shook, John and David Verble | June 13, 2013
Forms and Templates
When trying to solve a problem, you want to identify underlying causes, which will help you to prevent fires rather than just extinguish them. By identifying the underlying causes down to the root causes, you can reduce the likelihood that a given problem will recur.  The most common root-cause analysis technique in lean is the "Five Why's.  " This is practice of asking why repeatedly whenever a problem is encountered in order to get beyond the obvious symptoms to discover the root cause.  For instance, Taiichi Ohno gives this example about a machine that stopped working (Ohno 1988, p. 17):Why did More »
Action Planning Template (from Perfecting Patient Journeys)
By: Lean Transformations Group | January 29, 2013
Forms and Templates
When doing value-stream improvement, once there is a shared vision of a future state, you will still need to identify the specific changes that need to be made and translate those changes into clearly stated goals and actions (i.  e.  , the means) to achieve those goals.  Once you have agreed on the goals and targets, then you can identify the specific methods and action steps you think will help you achieve the goals. These action steps and targets constitute the action plan to achieve a specific goal.  If this type of planning is new to your team, the following suggestions and More »
End of Project Review Template (from Perfecting Patient Journeys)
By: Lean Transformations Group | January 29, 2013
Forms and Templates
The end of your first round of value-stream improvement is a good time to step back and reflect on your project—what’s been done, what still needs to be done, and what it means for the value stream you targeted for improvement and for your entire organization. The end-of-project review and reflection brings your PDCA cycle of improvement full circle, and prepares you to start the PDCA cycle over again.  In contrast to reviews during a project, which enable a team to assess execution of the plan and progress toward outcomes, the end-of-project review and reflection is intended for all involved to More »
Goal Development Template (from Perfecting Patient Journeys)
By: Lean Transformations Group | January 29, 2013
Forms and Templates
When doing value-stream improvement, once there is a shared vision of a future state, you will still need to identify the specific changes that need to be made and turn proposed changes into formal improvement goals.  Keep in mind that goals are not actions. Goals are the outcomes or results you want when you complete your implementation of your future state. You need to remain focused on the outcomes you want to achieve, not just actions you plan to take. To stay focused on outcomes, link the change you plan to make with the specific purpose for making the change.  More »
Master Schedule and Action Plan Template for One Goal (from Perfecting Patient Journeys)
By: Lean Transformations Group | January 29, 2013
Forms and Templates
When doing value-stream improvement, once there is a shared vision of a future state, you will still need to identify the specific changes that need to be made and translate those changes into clearly stated goals and actions (i.  e.  , the means) to achieve those goals.  Once you have agreed on the goals and actions, you need to develop a system to manage your improvement project. One option is to use this template in your project tracking center so you can track both goals and action items on the same form.  Perfecting Patient Journeys, from which this template is More »
Master Schedule Template (from Perfecting Patient Journeys)
By: Lean Transformations Group | January 29, 2013
Forms and Templates
As you develop a system to manage your improvement project, think about developing measures to answer three questions:Are we on schedule? (Level 1)Are we doing what we said we would do the way we said we would do it? (Level 2)If we are doing what we said we would do the way we said we would do it, are we having the impact we expect to achieve? (Level 3)Are we on schedule? (Level 1, Plan execution)“Are we on schedule?” should be answered during regular informal checks and formal reviews. Answering the question and communicating the answer can be easier if More »
Value Proposition Template (from Perfecting Patient Journeys)
By: Lean Transformations Group | January 29, 2013
Forms and Templates
A lean value proposition is used in value-stream improvement projects. It will help you and your team:Align the stakeholders around what will be included in addressing the problem,Identify the stakeholders who will be added to the project team and actively engaged in creating the current- and future-state value-stream maps,Identify additional stakeholders necessary to drive the implementation of the future state,Serve as an agreement—a proof of consensus—on the specific problem to be solved, and with the problem statement serve as authorization for the entire project.  The value proposition is not just a document to record discussions. It should be used to drive More »
Waste Walk Template (from Perfecting Patient Journeys)
By: Lean Transformations Group | January 29, 2013
Forms and Templates
It is a maxim in lean thinking that to fix any problem you must first see the waste. However, the longer you have worked in a system, the harder it is to see the waste around you.  Taking a “waste walk” is one way to make the waste visible again. A waste walk is simply a planned visit to where work is being performed to observe what’s happening and to note the waste. It differs from go-see activities in that you are specifically looking for waste.  Common objectives for your waste walks include:Validate the problems pointed out in the development More »
Standard Work Process Study Sheet
By: Kaizen Express | December 7, 2012
Forms and Templates
The Process Study Sheet is used to define and record the time for work elements in a process. Before timing, opbserve and list the work elements required to produce one element. Then observe and define the actual time required for each individual work element.  Timing TipsCollect real times at the process.  Position yourself so you can see the operator's hand motions.  Time each work element seperately.  Time several cycles of each work element.  Observe an operator who is qualified to perform the job.  Always seperate operator time and machine time.  Select the lowest repeatable time for each element.  Remember shop More »
Standard Work Production Analysis Board
By: Kaizen Express | December 7, 2012
Forms and Templates
A Production Analysis Board is a display that must be located at the exit of the cell (or the line) to show actual performance compared with planned performance on an hourly basis.  Kaizen Express, from which this example is taken, is a concise, precise illustrated guide to the fundamentals of the Toyota Production System and how to implement them. It is ideal for individuals or teams starting a lean transformation or in need of a quick refresher on the fundamental concepts of lean manufacturing.   Other Resources:WorkshopsStandardized Work: The Foundation for Kaizen »Management Standard Work »ArticlesFive Missing Pieces in Your Standardized More »
Standard Work Skills Training Matrix
By: Kaizen Express | December 7, 2012
Forms and Templates
The Skills Training Matrix shows the required and attained skills of every operator. The training schedule also should be shown.  Kaizen Express, from which this example is taken, is a concise, precise illustrated guide to the fundamentals of the Toyota Production System and how to implement them. It is ideal for individuals or teams starting a lean transformation or in need of a quick refresher on the fundamental concepts of lean manufacturing.   Other Resources:WorkshopsStandardized Work: The Foundation for Kaizen »Management Standard Work »ArticlesFive Missing Pieces in Your Standardized Work (Part 1 of 3) »Five Missing Pieces in Your Standardized Work More »
Standardized Work Process Capacity Sheet
December 7, 2012
Forms and Templates
The Process Capacity Chart is used to calculate the capacity of each machine to confirm true capacity and to identify and eliminate bottlenecks. Processing capacity per shift will be calculated from the available production time, completion time, and tool-change time (and other factors as necessary) for each work piece.  Kaizen Express, from which this example is taken, is a concise, precise illustrated guide to the fundamentals of the Toyota Production System and how to implement them. It is ideal for individuals or teams starting a lean transformation or in need of a quick refresher on the fundamental concepts of lean More »
Standard Work Operator Balance Chart(OBC)
December 6, 2012
Forms and Templates
The operator balance chart helps create continuous flow in a multistep, multioperator process by distributing operator work elements in relation to takt time. (Also called an operator loading diagram or a yamazumi board.  )Kaizen Express, from which this example is taken, is a concise, precise illustrated guide to the fundamentals of the Toyota Production System and how to implement them. It is ideal for individuals or teams starting a lean transformation or in need of a quick refresher on the fundamental concepts of lean manufacturing.   Other Resources:WorkshopsStandardized Work: The Foundation for Kaizen »Management Standard Work »ArticlesFive Missing Pieces in Your More »
Standardized Work Chart
December 6, 2012
Forms and Templates
The standardized work chart shows operator movement and material location in relation to the machine and overall process layout. It should show takt time, work sequence, and standard WIP.  The standardized work chart is one of the three basic forms for creating standardized work, along with the standardized work combination table and job instruction sheet. The purpose of standardized work, according to Kaizen Express from which this form is taken, is to provide a basis for continuous improvement through kaizen.  Kaizen Express, from which this example is taken, is a concise, precise illustrated guide to the fundamentals of the Toyota More »
Standardized Work Combination Table
December 6, 2012
Forms and Templates
The standardized work combination table shows the combination of manual work time, walk time, and machine processing time for each operation in a production sequence. This form is a more precise process design tool than the Operator Balance Chart. It can be very helpful to identify the waste of waiting and overburden, and to confirm standard work―in―process.  The standardized work combination table is one of three basic forms for creating standardized work, along with the standardized work chart and job instruction sheet. The purpose of standardized work, according to Kaizen Express from which this form is taken, is to provide More »
Standardized Work Job Instruction Sheet
December 6, 2012
Forms and Templates
The job instruction sheet is used to train new operations. It lists the steps of the job, detailing any special knack that may be required to perform the job saefly with utmost quality and efficiency. It can also be useful for experienced operators to reconfirm the right operations.  The job instruction sheet is one of three basic forms for creating standardized work, along with the standardized work chart and standardized work combination table. The purpose of standardized work, according to Kaizen Express from which this form is taken, is to provide a basis for continuous improvement through kaizen.  Kaizen Express, More »
Team Board Form (from Getting the Right Things Done)
By: Dennis, Pascal | December 11, 2006
Forms and Templates
A team board is a window on both routine and improvement work. The board on the following page addresses both daily production and strategic issues, and is organized according to SQDCM—safety, quality, delivery, cost, and morale. Team objectives and action plans are developed at the beginning of each annual planning cycle. Abnormalities and countermeasures are recorded and tracked manually. Recurrent abnormalities should trigger problem-solving and/or kaizen activity, which should be recorded (e.  g.  , a three-ring binder attached to the board). Teams should review production results daily and strategic results weekly. Corresponding "drills" need to be developed, piloted, and standardized. More »