Home>Knowledge Center
Found 26 records:   1 2 3    >> view all
Sort by: 
Filter by:

Sector

All Sectors
Administrative (23)
Healthcare (23)
Manufacturing (25)
Services (23)
Supply Stream (22)

Role

All Roles
Associate (10)
Executive (10)
Manager (20)
Supervisor (17)

Function

All Functions
Accounting and Finance (7)
Customer Service (8)
Human Resources (9)
IT (5)
Maintenance (8)
Operations (17)
Product/Service Development (7)
Production Control and Logistics (9)
Purchasing (7)
Quality (16)
Research and Development (6)
Sales and Marketing (7)

Media Format(1)

All Media Formats
A3s (5)
Articles (1)
Books (1)
Charts, Graphs and Diagrams (1)
Forms and Templates (26)
Software (1)
Value-Stream Maps (2)
Problem Definition Worksheet
Author: Lean Transformations Group
Summary
Media Format: Forms and Templates
Publish Date: 6/17/2013

In order to continuously improve, you must be able to find problems in order to solve them.Once you have found a problem, the first step you must take is to make sure you have properly defined the problem.

One way to look at problems (i.e., gaps) is to think in terms of standards. A gap can exist between current performance and an established standard or a new standard that you are attempting to achieve. A problem also can be unwanted variation in performance even when average performance appears acceptable. When even a single out-of-specification event is a problem, the gap can be defined as between the amount between any number of events and no events.

Whether you are trying to maintain a current standard, raise to a new standard, or reduce the number of out-of-specification events, this worksheet can help you breakdown the problem into a clearly defined gap as well as see how the problem aligns to the needs of the business or your True North purpose.

Perfecting Patient JourneysThis worksheet was developed by the authors of Perfecting Patient Journeys, a guide to value-stream improvement for healthcare organizations. Readers will learn how to identify and select a problem in the performance of a value stream, define a project scope, and create a shared understanding of what's occurring in the value stream. Readers will also learn to develop a shared vision of an improved future, and hopefully work together to make that vision a reality.

Root Cause Template
Author: Shook, John and David Verble
Summary
Media Format: Forms and Templates
Publish Date: 6/13/2013

When trying to solve a problem, you want to identify underlying causes, which will help you to prevent fires rather than just extinguish them. By identifying the underlying causes down to the root causes, you can reduce the likelihood that a given problem will recur.

The most common root-cause analysis technique in lean is the "Five Why's." This is practice of asking why repeatedly whenever a problem is encountered in order to get beyond the obvious symptoms to discover the root cause.

For instance, Taiichi Ohno gives this example about a machine that stopped working (Ohno 1988, p. 17):

  1. Why did the machine stop? There was an overload and the fuse blew.
  2. Why was there an overload? The bearing was not sufficiently lubricated.
  3. Why was it not lubricated? The lubrication pump was not pumping sufficiently.
  4. Why was it not pumping sufficiently? The shaft of the pump was worn and rattling.
  5. Why was the shaft worn out? There was no strainer attached and metal scraps got in.

Without repeatedly asking why, managers would simply replace the fuse or pump and the failure would recur. The specific number five is not the point. Rather it is to keep asking until the root cause is reached and eliminated.

This template gives you space to record the problem as well as the direct causes and underlying causes.

Action Planning Template (from Perfecting Patient Journeys)
Author: Lean Transformations Group
Summary
Media Format: Forms and Templates
Publish Date: 1/29/2013

When doing value-stream improvement, once there is a shared vision of a future state, you will still need to identify the specific changes that need to be made and translate those changes into clearly stated goals and actions (i.e., the means) to achieve those goals.

Once you have agreed on the goals and targets, then you can identify the specific methods and action steps you think will help you achieve the goals. These action steps and targets constitute the action plan to achieve a specific goal.

If this type of planning is new to your team, the following suggestions and steps for action planning can be helpful.

Planning suggestions:

  • Brainstorm the steps needed to implement the change you try. Write the steps on sticky notes and move them around until you get a complete set in a logical sequence.
  • Determine who will be responsible for ensuring each action step occurs. It does not have to be a member of the improvement team. However, it should be someone who is familiar with the work to be performed, who can lead the effort, and who was involved in developing and committed to the future-state vision. 
  • Assign timing targets to each step. (Start from the end and work your way back to the beginning. That will ensure that you incorporate the steps into the time you have available to complete the goal.)
  • Assign quality targets to steps as appropriate.
  • Identify any resources/support personnel required to complete the action. Remember, you must keep your resources within your original problem scope. However, you will need to expand beyond your improvement team to include people who are doing the work involved in the action steps and, in some cases, people/groups who supply or are customers of this work.
  • Socialize your plan with the key stakeholders.

Perfecting Patient JourneysPerfecting Patient Journeys, from which this template is taken, is a guide to value-stream improvement for leaders of healthcare organizations who want to implement lean thinking and engage employees in solving problems in order to deliver better and more efficient care. Readers will learn how to identify and select a problem in the performance of a value stream, define a project scope, and create a shared understanding of what's occurring in the value stream. Readers will also learn to develop a shared vision of an improved future, and hopefully work together to make that vision a reality.

End of Project Review Template (from Perfecting Patient Journeys)
Author: Lean Transformations Group
Summary
Media Format: Forms and Templates
Publish Date: 1/29/2013

The end of your first round of value-stream improvement is a good time to step back and reflect on your project—what’s been done, what still needs to be done, and what it means for the value stream you targeted for improvement and for your entire organization. The end-of-project review and reflection brings your PDCA cycle of improvement full circle, and prepares you to start the PDCA cycle over again.

In contrast to reviews during a project, which enable a team to assess execution of the plan and progress toward outcomes, the end-of-project review and reflection is intended for all involved to pull back to a higher and broader view. The end-of-project review is a time to assess performance to purpose for the project as a whole, and to reflect on what was learned that can be used when deciding subsequent actions. Options for next actions depend on comparison of actual performance and outcomes to the original stated purpose.

The following template will help you capture your end-of-project reflections and make decisions about what to do next.

Perfecting Patient JourneysPerfecting Patient Journeys, from which this template is taken, is a guide to value-stream improvement for leaders of healthcare organizations who want to implement lean thinking and engage employees in solving problems in order to deliver better and more efficient care. Readers will learn how to identify and select a problem in the performance of a value stream, define a project scope, and create a shared understanding of what's occurring in the value stream. Readers will also learn to develop a shared vision of an improved future, and hopefully work together to make that vision a reality.

Goal Development Template (from Perfecting Patient Journeys)
Author: Lean Transformations Group
Summary
Media Format: Forms and Templates
Publish Date: 1/29/2013

When doing value-stream improvement, once there is a shared vision of a future state, you will still need to identify the specific changes that need to be made and turn proposed changes into formal improvement goals.

Keep in mind that goals are not actions. Goals are the outcomes or results you want when you complete your implementation of your future state. You need to remain focused on the outcomes you want to achieve, not just actions you plan to take. To stay focused on outcomes, link the change you plan to make with the specific purpose for making the change.

Improvement goals = change in value stream + purpose

Perfecting Patient JourneysPerfecting Patient Journeys, from which this template is taken, is a guide to value-stream improvement for leaders of healthcare organizations who want to implement lean thinking and engage employees in solving problems in order to deliver better and more efficient care. Readers will learn how to identify and select a problem in the performance of a value stream, define a project scope, and create a shared understanding of what's occurring in the value stream. Readers will also learn to develop a shared vision of an improved future, and hopefully work together to make that vision a reality.

Master Schedule and Action Plan Template for One Goal (from Perfecting Patient Journeys)
Author: Lean Transformations Group
Summary
Media Format: Forms and Templates
Publish Date: 1/29/2013

When doing value-stream improvement, once there is a shared vision of a future state, you will still need to identify the specific changes that need to be made and translate those changes into clearly stated goals and actions (i.e., the means) to achieve those goals.

Once you have agreed on the goals and actions, you need to develop a system to manage your improvement project. One option is to use this template in your project tracking center so you can track both goals and action items on the same form.

Perfecting Patient JourneysPerfecting Patient Journeys, from which this template is taken, is a guide to value-stream improvement for leaders of healthcare organizations who want to implement lean thinking and engage employees in solving problems in order to deliver better and more efficient care. Readers will learn how to identify and select a problem in the performance of a value stream, define a project scope, and create a shared understanding of what's occurring in the value stream. Readers will also learn to develop a shared vision of an improved future, and hopefully work together to make that vision a reality.

Master Schedule Template (from Perfecting Patient Journeys)
Author: Lean Transformations Group
Summary
Media Format: Forms and Templates
Publish Date: 1/29/2013

As you develop a system to manage your improvement project, think about developing measures to answer three questions:

  1. Are we on schedule? (Level 1)
  2. Are we doing what we said we would do the way we said we would do it? (Level 2)
  3. If we are doing what we said we would do the way we said we would do it, are we having the impact we expect to achieve? (Level 3)

Are we on schedule? (Level 1, Plan execution)

“Are we on schedule?” should be answered during regular informal checks and formal reviews. Answering the question and communicating the answer can be easier if you use a visual tool such as the project-plan tracking tool or master schedule. This template will help you answer this question by letting you include the project goals with space to indicate whether each goal is on track as originally planned and whether the scheduled progress review has taken place.

Perfecting Patient JourneysPerfecting Patient Journeys, from which this form is taken, is a guide to value-stream improvement for leaders of healthcare organizations who want to implement lean thinking and engage employees in solving problems in order to deliver better and more efficient care. Readers will learn how to identify and select a problem in the performance of a value stream, define a project scope, and create a shared understanding of what's occurring in the value stream. Readers will also learn to develop a shared vision of an improved future, and hopefully work together to make that vision a reality.

Value Proposition Template (from Perfecting Patient Journeys)
Author: Lean Transformations Group
Summary
Media Format: Forms and Templates
Publish Date: 1/29/2013

A lean value proposition is used in value-stream improvement projects. It will help you and your team:

  • Align the stakeholders around what will be included in addressing the problem,
  • Identify the stakeholders who will be added to the project team and actively engaged in creating the current- and future-state value-stream maps,
  • Identify additional stakeholders necessary to drive the implementation of the future state,
  • Serve as an agreement—a proof of consensus—on the specific problem to be solved, and with the problem statement serve as authorization for the entire project.

The value proposition is not just a document to record discussions. It should be used to drive the discussions and reach consensus.

Perfecting Patient JourneysPerfecting Patient Journeys, from which this form is taken, is a guide to value-stream improvement for leaders of healthcare organizations who want to implement lean thinking and engage employees in solving problems in order to deliver better and more efficient care. Readers will learn how to identify and select a problem in the performance of a value stream, define a project scope, and create a shared understanding of what's occurring in the value stream. Readers will also learn to develop a shared vision of an improved future, and hopefully work together to make that vision a reality.

Waste Walk Template (from Perfecting Patient Journeys)
Author: Lean Transformations Group
Summary
Media Format: Forms and Templates
Publish Date: 1/29/2013

It is a maxim in lean thinking that to fix any problem you must first see the waste. However, the longer you have worked in a system, the harder it is to see the waste around you.

Taking a “waste walk” is one way to make the waste visible again. A waste walk is simply a planned visit to where work is being performed to observe what’s happening and to note the waste. It differs from go-see activities in that you are specifically looking for waste.

Common objectives for your waste walks include:

  • Validate the problems pointed out in the development of the current-state map.
  • Provide a format to continue to socialize the redesign effort.
  • Provide an initial opportunity to gather staff ideas about the current-state problems.

Waste Walk Guidelines

  1. Huddle with your team members:
    • Describe the purpose,
    • Describe the various forms of wastes and examples,
    • Pass out copies of the current-state map and identified problems, and
    • Assign areas to walk to you team. It’s usually better to have a pair of people for each assignment.
  1. As a group walk the whole value stream depicted on your map to confirm the areas of the individual/pair assignments.
  2. Explain to the people in the area of observation what you are doing. Share the map and waste examples and describe the objectives of the observation activity.
  3. Move to areas for individual assignments, and study the areas for 30–45 minutes.
  4. As you see work that appears to be waste, jot down the example you see.
  5. Return to the team and discuss what you have seen.
  6. As a team, match the wastes you see to problems previously identified in the current-state map. If other significant problems are identified during the walk, place them on the map.
  7. Put the results of the waste walk next to the current-state map being shared in the area and use the examples to continue to socialize the current state and the system-level problems that frustrate the people and process.

Perfecting Patient JourneysPerfecting Patient Journeys, from which this form is taken, is a guide to value-stream improvement for leaders of healthcare organizations who want to implement lean thinking and engage employees in solving problems in order to deliver better and more efficient care. Readers will learn how to identify and select a problem in the performance of a value stream, define a project scope, and create a shared understanding of what's occurring in the value stream. Readers will also learn to develop a shared vision of an improved future, and hopefully work together to make that vision a reality.

Standard Work Process Study Sheet
Author: Kaizen Express
Summary
Media Format: Forms and Templates
Publish Date: 12/7/2012

The Process Study Sheet is used to define and record the time for work elements in a process. Before timing, opbserve and list the work elements required to produce one element. Then observe and define the actual time required for each individual work element.

Timing Tips

  • Collect real times at the process.
  • Position yourself so you can see the operator's hand motions.
  • Time each work element seperately.
  • Time several cycles of each work element.
  • Observe an operator who is qualified to perform the job.
  • Always seperate operator time and machine time.
  • Select the lowest repeatable time for each element.
  • Remember shop floor courtesy.

Kaizen Express

Kaizen ExpressKaizen Express, from which this example is taken, is a concise, precise illustrated guide to the fundamentals of the Toyota Production System and how to implement them. It is ideal for individuals or teams starting a lean transformation or in need of a quick refresher on the fundamental concepts of lean manufacturing.

 

Other Resources:

Workshops

Articles

Kaizen Express