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Renée Smith

Renée Smith

Director of Workplace Transformation, Governor’s Results Washington Office, State of Washington
renee.smith@gov.wa.gov

Renée Smith serves as the Director of Workplace Transformation for Washington State as part of the Governor’s Results Washington Team. She champions a more humane and effective workplace through primary research, writing, and speaking on Making Work More Human by increasing love and decreasing fear in the workplace. Renée leads the development of the Human Workplace community across the state and provides resources to cultivate human-centered leaders, teams, and Lean advisers.

Renée has spoken across the US, Canada, and Spain, including for LEI’s 2018 Coaching Summit, 2018 AME San Diego, the Foundation for Healthcare Quality, the Catalonia Institute for Construction Technology, Lean in the Public Sector International Conference 2018, the Canadian Government Lean Summit, the US Army’s Regional Health Command Pacific Warriors Care and Transition Summit, and for many other organizations. 

She’s a founding member of the HumansFirst.club and has been featured on numerous podcasts including Gemba Academy and The Higher Purpose Podcast, and soon on Robert Martichenko’s Drift and Hum, Heather Younger’s Leadership with Heart, GoLeanSixSigma’s Just In Time Café.  

Before joining Results Washington, Renée spent nearly seven years at the Department of Enterprise Services where she served on the Corporate Council and led the Organization Development Services division that provided Lean Transformation Services and Change Excellence Services to DES and G2G Lean Consulting to other state and local governments. Renée earned a Master of Science in Organization Development from Pepperdine University. She lives in Tacoma and enjoys drawing, cooking, and traveling.

Workshops Taught by Renée Smith
A Human Workplace: Building the Foundation for a Lean Culture and Management System (at the 2019 Lean Summit) Every day in every organization something is at the center of work. Something is most important and that something drives every other decision and action for teams and individuals. Building a lean, human-centered workplace means putting people at the center. It means creating physical and psychological safety, based on more love and less fear to make work more human. With that foundation in place, team members can be coached to point out problems, challenge assumptions, ask questions, discover root causes, share ideas, test solutions, and learn, learn, learn.  But other priorities can invade the center of our work with serious More »